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Probable PTSD Linked to Bronchodilator Response, Asthma


HealthDay News
Updated: Sep 9th 2016

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FRIDAY, Sept. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with bronchodilator response (BDR) and incident asthma, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical care Medicine.

Rafael E. de la Hoz, M.D., M.P.H., from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, and colleagues examined the correlation between probable PTSD and both BDR and incident asthma in a cohort of 11,481 World Trade Center workers in New York, including 6,133 never smokers. A total of 61.3 percent of the never smokers completed a follow-up visit several years later (mean, 4.95 years).

The researchers found that probable PTSD at baseline correlated with BDR among all participants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.43); similar results were seen for never smokers with asthma. Probable PTSD at baseline correlated with incident asthma among 3,757 never smokers, even after adjustment for baseline BDR (odds ratio, 2.41). In a confirmatory analysis the significant correlation persisted after excluding 195 subjects with baseline BDR.

"In a cohort of adult workers exposed to a severe traumatic event, probable PTSD is significantly associated with BDR at baseline, and predicts incident asthma," the authors write.

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