powered by centersite dot net
Medications
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
When Is an Opioid Safe to Take?Lifesaving Drugs From Pfizer in Short Supply: FDALeading U.S. Doctors' Group Takes Aim at Rising Drug PricesU.S. Hospitals Still Prescribe Too Many Antibiotics: StudyBirth Control Pills Recalled Due to Danger of Unintended PregnancyNew Drugs Show Promise as First to Prevent MigraineMedication Adherence Up With Refill Synchronization ModelModified Vancomycin May Help Fight Bacterial ResistanceScientists Tweak Antibiotic to Boost Power Against 'Superbugs'New Cholesterol Fighting Meds Target Key GeneResearchers Say PDE5 Inhibitors Don't Cause MelanomaNearly a Third of Drugs Hit by Safety Issues After FDA ApprovalU.S. Moves to Avert Shortage of Yellow Fever VaccineOpioid Use by Iraq, Afghanistan War Vets Mirrors Rest of U.S.: StudyApril 29 Is National Prescription Drug Take Back DayERs Administering More Medications IntranasallyFDA Warns Against Children Taking Codeine, TramadolPhysicians Finding Ways to Work Around Cost of Rx MedicationsRuling Out Penicillin Allergy by Testing Inpatients Saves MoneyEpiPen Out-of-Pocket Costs More Than Doubled Over DecadeAACR: Regular Aspirin Use Linked to Lower Cancer MortalityFDA Approves Noctiva Nasal Spray for Nocturnal PolyuriaFDA Approves Odactra for House Dust Mite AllergiesHow Much Melatonin Is Really in That Supplement?Antidepressant Efficacy Varies for Depressive Symptom ClustersDo You Need an Antibiotic?'Off-Label' Antidepressants Common, But Where's the Evidence?Docs More Likely to Prescribe Antibiotics If Patients Expect ThemSimilar Adverse Event Risk for Typical, Atypical AntipsychoticsRx Adherence Reminders No More Effective at 'Fresh Start' DatesThink You're Allergic to Penicillin? Check AgainExcessive FDA Regulation Driving High Drug PricesOutcomes-Based Pricing Suggested for New, Costly DrugsPrices Skyrocket on Drugs Widely Used by Seniors: Report1 in 6 U.S. Adults Takes a Psychiatric Drug: StudyU.S. Doctors Still Over-Prescribing Drugs: SurveyWider Low-Dose Aspirin Use Would Save U.S. $692 Billion: StudyHealth Tip: Get the Facts About AntibioticsThese Medicines Often Send Americans to ERsHealth Tip: Be Aware of Drug and Food InteractionsCan Time-Release Capsules Replace Daily Pills?Prices of Generic Heart Failure Drugs Vary WidelyAmericans Fed Up With Soaring Drug Prices: HealthDay/Harris PollSaturday, Oct. 22 Is Drug Take Back DayHow Older People Can Head Off Dangerous Drug InteractionsCDC: Too Many Antibiotics Still Being Prescribed in U.S.Codeine Not Safe for Kids, Pediatricians WarnHealth Tip: Reading the Label on OTC MedicationsMylan to Offer Generic EpiPenSteep Rise in U.S. Drug Prices Tied to Patent Monopolies
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Anxiety Disorders
Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Mental Disorders
Mental Health Professions

AACR: Regular Aspirin Use Linked to Lower Cancer Mortality


HealthDay News
Updated: Apr 3rd 2017

new article illustration

MONDAY, April 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Regular aspirin use is associated with reduced mortality, mainly due to a lower risk of dying from any cancer, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, held from April 1 to 5 in Washington, D.C.

Yin Cao, M.P.H., Sc.D., from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues examined the correlation between aspirin use and subsequent total and cancer-specific mortality among 86,206 women in the Nurses' Health Study and 43,977 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study.

The researchers found that regular aspirin use correlated with reduced risk of total mortality compared with nonregular use (multivariable-adjusted relative risks [RRs], 0.93 and 0.89 for women and men, respectively), which was mainly due to a lower risk of dying from any cancer (RRs, 0.93 and 0.85 for women and men, respectively), especially colorectal cancers (RRs, 0.69 and 0.70, respectively), breast cancers (RR, 0.89), prostate cancers (RR, 0.77), and lung cancers in men (RR, 0.86). For both men and women, the benefit of aspirin on cancer mortality was seen with use of 0.5 to 1.5 standard aspirin tablets per week; lower cancer mortality was seen for a minimum duration of regular use of six years.

"Accumulating evidence suggests that aspirin not only reduces the risk of developing cancer, but may also play a strong role in reducing death from cancer," Cao said in a statement.

Press Release
More Information