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Adolescent Parenting IntroductionHealthy Teens: Food, Eating & Nutrition During AdolescenceHealthy Teens: Exercise and SportsHealthy Teens: SleepParenting Teens: Clothing Clashes, Housing Decisions, & Financial ManagementParenting Teens: Skincare, Cosmetics, Tattoos, & Piercings Caring for Teens: Healthcare for Teens and Young AdultsParenting Teens: Discipline, Love, Rules & ExpectationsA Parentís Guide to Protecting Teensí Health and SafetyAdolescent Parenting Summary & ConclusionAdolescent Parenting: References & ResourcesLatest News
Repeat Teen Births Still a Problem in United States: CDCIs Your Child Using Drugs?Puberty's Onset May Depend on DNAAt What Age Can Kids Safely Cross the Street?College Now the Place to Try Pot: StudyMoney Spent on Teen Health a Good Global InvestmentStudy Cites Factors Linked to Suicide in the YoungEarly School Start Times Tough on TeensMarijuana Use Higher in Pregnant Teens Than Nonpregnant PeersRegular Phys Ed Builds More Than FitnessWater Outperforms Sports Drinks for Young AthletesCross-Sex Hormones Appear to Be Safe for Transgender TeensRace Affects Obesity-Related Risk of Adolescent Hypertension1 in 3 Teens With Autism Licensed to Drive, Study FindsRace May Play Role in Obese Teens' Blood PressureFDA Approves Hep C Drugs for Kids 12 and OlderPhysical Activity Independently Predicts Bone Strength in TeensTeens Who Are Lazy Bones Have Weaker Skeletons: StudyKids Peppered With Pot AdsTobacco Use in Youth Higher Among Sexual MinoritiesTeens Exposed to Opioid Rx at Risk for Serious OutcomesTreatment Seeking Low Among Teens With Eating DisordersTeens With Autism More Likely to Land in ER, Study FindsHealth Tip: Help Teens Say No to Drinking and Driving1 in 4 Teens Exposed to Secondhand E-Cig Vapors: ReportMany College Football Players Lack Vitamin D: StudySerious Crash Often a Wake-Up Call for Teen DriversSavvy Marketing Gets Schoolkids to Eat Their GreensWhich High School Sport Has the Most Concussions?Kids Start Moving Less After Age 7, Study Finds'Synthetic Pot' Tied to Risky Sex, Violence and Drug Abuse in TeensPot + Booze = Skidding College GradesMore Teens Turning Their Backs on Tanning Beds: CDCPoor Diet in Adolescence May Raise Risk of Early Breast CancerConcussions More Likely in Female AthletesPediatricians Revise Guidelines for Teen Victims of Sexual AssaultAs Pot Legalization Advances, Pediatricians Warn of DangersIs a Drowsy Teen Headed for a Life of Crime?Same-Sex Marriage Laws Tied to Fewer Teen SuicidesStudent-Athletes Don't Have to Be Hit By InjuriesTeens May Go Hungry as Poorest Families Struggle to Feed KidsCollege Students Seem to Take Longer to Recover From ConcussionE-Cigs May Be 'Bridge' to Teens' Tobacco UseHarsh Parenting Can Backfire With Bad Behavior From TeensU.S. Teens Lag on Recommended VaccinationsU.S. High School Kids Abandoning Sweetened SodasTamer Version of Youth Football Looks to Address Safety ConcernsLow Back Pain Common Among KidsHealth Tip: Graduating High School?When College Kids Surf the Web in Class, Grades Fall
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Money Spent on Teen Health a Good Global Investment

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Apr 20th 2017

new article illustration

THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Worldwide investments in teen health could yield significant economic returns, a new study contends.

"Investing in young people is in everyone's interest," said Babatunde Osotimehin, executive director of the United Nations Population Fund. "A small investment in empowering and protecting the world's over a billion adolescents can bring a 10-fold return, or sometimes even more."

Improving the physical, mental and sexual health of kids aged 10 to 19 -- at a cost equivalent to US$4.60 per person per year -- could result in a 10-fold economic return by preventing 12 million deaths and more than 30 million unwanted pregnancies, the study authors reported.

Investing in teen education at a cost of $22.60 per person each year would generate a 12-fold economic return, and lead to an additional 12 million formal jobs for young adults, the researchers said.

Investing in improved road safety at 60 cents per person per year would result in a sixfold economic return and prevent nearly 500,000 adolescent deaths by 2030, the study suggested. In addition, programs to reduce child marriage, at a cost of $3.80 per person, would provide a 5.7-fold return on investment and could reduce child marriage by around one-third.

The report was published April 19 in The Lancet, just before a World Bank meeting in Washington, D.C., where finance and development leaders from 188 countries will discuss the need to invest in teens.

Study lead author Peter Sheehan said, "Some of the best investments in adolescent health and well-being lie outside the health sector -- tackling child marriage, reducing road injuries and improving education.

"There is little doubt that the actions outlined in our study could be delivered on a large scale in countries, transforming the lives of boys and girls around the world," he added in a journal news release.

Sheehan is a professor at Victoria University in Australia.

Study co-author George Patton, a professor at the University of Melbourne in Australia, noted that "there are 1.2 billion 10- to 19-year-olds in the world today. Investments to transform health, education, family and legal systems will help improve their physical, cognitive [mental], social, and emotional capabilities."

According to Patton, "This will generate a triple dividend reducing death and disability in adolescents today, promote health and productivity across the life-course, and because this is the next generation to parent, provide the best possible start to life for the generation to come.

"This generation of young people can transform all our futures. There is no more pressing task in global health than ensuring they have the resources to do so," he added.

Osotimehin concluded, "Our pioneering research must now be seen by policy makers, and used to chart the way forward."

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more on teen health.