powered by centersite dot net
Medications
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
3MR Intervention Effective for Discontinuing Inappropriate MedsDoes a Drug's High Price Tag Cause Its Own Side Effects?Commercialization of Generics Impacts Adverse Event RatesProcess Promising for On-Site Printing of Custom-Dosed MedsHealth Tip: Medication Use After a Natural DisasterFew Older Patients Aware of DeprescribingHealth Tip: Medication Suggestions for Older AdultsPhysicians Tweeting About Drugs May Have Conflict of InterestWhite Kids More Likely to Get Unneeded AntibioticsNew Cholesterol Drugs Vastly Overpriced, Study ContendsFDA May Limit 'Risk Info' in Direct-to-Consumer TV Drug AdsHealth Tip: Throwing Out Leftover MedicineFDA Announces Recall of Some Liquid Pharmaceutical ProductsIs FDA Taking Close Enough Look at Fast-Tracked Drugs?U.S. Antidepressant Use Jumps 65 Percent in 15 YearsThe Fine Print on Medication Expiration DatesAmericans Taking More Prescription Drugs Than Ever: SurveyInappropriate Med Use High in Cognitively Impaired SeniorsA Reminder That Meds and Grapefruit Don't Always MixAspirin Responsiveness Can Change After Bariatric SurgerySome Medicines Boost Sensitivity to SunPainkiller Prescriptions More Prone to Errors If HandwrittenMedication Mistakes Have Doubled in U.S. Since 2000: StudyMarket Competition Linked to Change in Generic Drug PricesIs Your Child's 'Penicillin Allergy' Real?FDA Seeks to Increase Number of Generic Drugs on MarketWhen Is an Opioid Safe to Take?Lifesaving Drugs From Pfizer in Short Supply: FDALeading U.S. Doctors' Group Takes Aim at Rising Drug PricesU.S. Hospitals Still Prescribe Too Many Antibiotics: StudyBirth Control Pills Recalled Due to Danger of Unintended PregnancyNew Drugs Show Promise as First to Prevent MigraineMedication Adherence Up With Refill Synchronization ModelModified Vancomycin May Help Fight Bacterial ResistanceScientists Tweak Antibiotic to Boost Power Against 'Superbugs'New Cholesterol Fighting Meds Target Key GeneResearchers Say PDE5 Inhibitors Don't Cause MelanomaNearly a Third of Drugs Hit by Safety Issues After FDA ApprovalU.S. Moves to Avert Shortage of Yellow Fever VaccineOpioid Use by Iraq, Afghanistan War Vets Mirrors Rest of U.S.: StudyApril 29 Is National Prescription Drug Take Back DayERs Administering More Medications IntranasallyFDA Warns Against Children Taking Codeine, TramadolPhysicians Finding Ways to Work Around Cost of Rx MedicationsRuling Out Penicillin Allergy by Testing Inpatients Saves MoneyEpiPen Out-of-Pocket Costs More Than Doubled Over DecadeAACR: Regular Aspirin Use Linked to Lower Cancer MortalityFDA Approves Noctiva Nasal Spray for Nocturnal PolyuriaFDA Approves Odactra for House Dust Mite AllergiesHow Much Melatonin Is Really in That Supplement?
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Anxiety Disorders
Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Mental Disorders
Mental Health Professions

FDA Warns Against Children Taking Codeine, Tramadol


HealthDay News
Updated: Apr 21st 2017

new article illustration

FRIDAY, April 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children should not be given any medications containing codeine or tramadol due to risk of life-threatening breathing difficulties, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Thursday.

Children under 12 should not take either codeine or tramadol. Children under 18 also should not be given tramadol to treat pain following tonsillectomy or adenoidectomy, the agency said. Codeine labeling already warns against postoperative use for children. The agency also advises that these drugs should not be used in children 12 to 18 who are obese, have obstructive sleep apnea, or have a weakened respiratory system. Nursing mothers should also avoid using these drugs.

Some children and adults are genetically predisposed to process opioid drugs more quickly, the FDA said. That can cause the level of narcotics in the bloodstream to rise too high and too quickly, risking overdose in children, due to their smaller size. "It's very hard to determine which child or mother has this risk, so that's why we've taken this action today," Douglas Throckmorton, M.D., deputy center director for regulatory programs at the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said during a media briefing Thursday.

Warning labels on medications containing codeine or tramadol will be strengthened to reflect these potential dangers, the FDA said in a statement.

More Information