powered by centersite dot net
Mental Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Medical License Questions Sway Doctors' Mental Health HelpAmericans More Open About Mental Health Issues, But Stigma LingersNarrow Networks in ACA Marketplace for Mental HealthHurricanes' Toll on Mental Health Will LingerER Visits for These 3 Health Woes Don't Have to HappenPsychosocial Intervention App Feasible in Serious Mental IllnessHealth Tip: Mental Disorders Are CommonNearly 1 in 5 U.S. Adults Has Mental Illness or Drug ProblemHalf of Opioid Prescriptions Go to People With Mental IllnessSAMHSA: 9.8 Million U.S. Adults Have Serious Mental IllnessNearly 10 Million U.S. Adults Suffer From Mental IllnessMental Health Myths Abound in the U.S.Care Access Worsening for Adults With Psychological DistressJust 1 in 5 Mentally Ill Women Gets Cervical Cancer ScreeningsAnxious? Distressed? You're Not AlonePast Psychiatric Disorders Do Not Raise Risk of Alzheimer's DiseaseSelf-Harm Can Be a Harbinger of SuicideClimate Change May Cloud Americans' Mental Health: ReportKetamine Beneficial for Certain Patients With Mood DisordersPatients Reluctant to Comply With Drug-Only Psychiatric TreatmentPatients Often Reject Drug-Only Psychiatric TreatmentStudy Links Psychiatric Disorders to Stroke RiskObamacare Covered More People With Mental Illness, AddictionsMany With Mental Illness Miss Out on HIV TestsPlastic Surgeons Often Miss Patients' Mental DisordersMortality Risk in T2DM Increased With Depression and/or AnxietyMost Smokers With Mental Illness Want to Kick the HabitRate of Psychiatric Drug Use About 16 Percent in U.S. Adults1 in 6 U.S. Adults Takes a Psychiatric Drug: StudyFor People With Mental Health Woes, Pets Can Be InvaluableHealth Tip: Thinking About Psychological Therapy?Heart Rate, BP in Male Teens Tied to Later Risk for Psych DisordersU.S. Psychiatric Patients Face Long Waits in ERsU.S. Soldier in Custody Following Slaying of 5 Americans in Iraq
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Anxiety Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Schizophrenia
Eating Disorders
Medications

Mental Health Myths Abound in the U.S.

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: May 2nd 2017

new article illustration

TUESDAY, May 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Ignorance, myths and stigma are still common among Americans when it comes to mental health, a new survey finds.

The web-based survey of nearly 4,600 people nationwide revealed that less than half can recognize anxiety. Most people don't know what to do about depression even if they recognize it. And nearly 80 percent don't believe prescription drug abuse is a treatable problem.

The Michigan State University survey, released at the start of Mental Health Month in May, focused on four major issues: anxiety, depression, alcohol abuse and prescription drug abuse.

"Our work is designed to help communities think about how to address behavioral health challenges as they emerge, whether that's drug abuse, anxiety or other issues, and the challenges such as suicide that can accompany them," co-investigator Mark Skidmore said in a university news release.

"Although great strides have been made in the area of mental health literacy in recent decades, the discrepancies in mental health knowledge, helping behaviors and stigma show the importance of continuing to educate the public about mental health issues," the researchers wrote.

They hope health officials and policymakers use the survey findings to better identify where to target education and prevention efforts for the four mental health issues, including the growing problem of prescription drug abuse.

Health officials say the opioid painkiller epidemic, which killed more than 33,000 people in 2015, is the worst drug crisis in American history, the researchers noted.

The survey found that 32 percent of respondents did not know the signs of prescription drug abuse: taking higher doses than prescribed, excessive mood swings, changes in sleeping patterns, poor decision-making and seeking prescriptions from more than one doctor.

The percentages were higher among people ages 18 to 34 (47 percent) and men (44 percent), according to the survey.

More information

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has more on mental health.