powered by centersite dot net
Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Scoliosis Screenings Can Help Catch Spine Problem EarlyArthritis Can Strike ChildrenPlan an Allergy-Safe Halloween for Your ChildHappier Mealtimes, Healthier Eating for KidsAAP Releases List of Often-Unnecessary TestsUSPSTF Recommends Counseling Youth on Sun Protection BehaviorChildhood Obesity Up Worldwide Almost 10-Fold Over 4 DecadesStart Skin Cancer Prevention Early, Health Experts SayHealth Tip: Getting Enough SleepSurviving Congenital Heart Disease as Child Not a Ticket to Good HealthHealth Tip: Children and Screen UseHealth Tip: Suggestions for a Healthy HalloweenMaking Halloween a Treat for Kids With DiabetesHealth Tip: Learn Symptoms of Childhood SinusitisChildhood 'Growth' Tests Not Always NecessaryMore U.S. Measles Cases From No Vaccine vs. Imported DiseaseMeasles Making a Comeback in the United StatesReassuring Kids After Another Senseless TragedyBilingual Kids Learn New Languages BetterGirls' Sports-Related Concussions May Last Twice As LongTeens Mixed Up With the Law May Fall Through Medicaid CracksLooking at Laughter for Clues to Anti-Social BehaviorDon't Let Your Kids Get Sidelined With Sports-Related Infections'Off-Roading' Threat May Lurk in the AirHealth Tip: Identifying Chicken PoxCould Pests, Dust Lower Kids' Odds for Asthma?When a Cold or Flu Strikes a Family MemberBooze Often Glorified On YouTube VideosInflammatory Bowel Disease May Raise Cancer Risk in KidsAAP: Few Doctors Provide Firearm Injury Prevention Info in ERDoctors Eye the Danger From 'Nerf' GunsParents Say Schools Don't Help Kids With Mental Health, Chronic DiseaseIt's a Food Allergy! Where's the School Nurse?Big Rise in Hospitalized Kids With Opioid Side EffectsAAP: Opioid Dependence/Abuse Public Health Issue for ChildrenGolf Carts' Use Is Spreading, and So Is Danger to KidsState Laws Have Big Impact on Kids' Gun InjuriesHealth Tip: On Kids and PetsHurricanes May Have Longer-Lasting Impact on KidsHeath Tip: Getting Rid of Head LiceState Laws Curb Kids' Injuries Tied to Off-Road VehiclesBrown-Bagging It? Think Outside the BoxVaccine Campaign in Poor Countries to Save 20 Million LivesFor City Kids With Asthma, Nearby Green Space Is KeyHealth Tip: Fuel Your Child With a Good BreakfastIncrease in Medical Exemptions From Immunization in CaliforniaPut Flu Shot on the Back-to-School ChecklistThroat Bacteria Linked to Bone and Joint Infection in KidsHarvey's Wrath Still Poses Risks to ChildrenHeath Tip: It's Back-to-School Time
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)
Child Development & Parenting: Middle (8-11)
Child Development Theory: Adolescence (12-24)

When a Divorce Turns Bitter, Kids' Immune Systems May Pay a Price

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Jun 5th 2017

new article illustration

MONDAY, June 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An unfriendly divorce can raise a child's risk of colds in adulthood, a new study suggests.

"Early life stressful experiences do something to our physiology and inflammatory processes that increase risk for poorer health and chronic illness," explained researcher Michael Murphy of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.

"This work is a step forward in our understanding of how family stress during childhood may influence a child's susceptibility to disease 20-40 years later," Murphy said in a university news release. He's a psychology postdoctoral research associate.

The study found that children whose parents separate and don't speak are at increased risk for colds as adults.

Previous research has shown that adults who experience the split of parents during childhood are at increased risk for poorer health. The authors of this new study believe their work may help explain why that's so.

The study included more than 200 healthy adults exposed to a common cold virus. Those whose parents lived apart and didn't talk to each other during the participant's childhood were more than three times more likely to develop a cold than those whose parents remained together.

While the study only found an association and not a cause-and-effect link, one reason suggested by the researchers for the increased risk of a cold was heightened inflammation in response to viral infection.

Meanwhile, the researchers found that adults whose parents separated during childhood but remained in contact were not at increased risk of catching a cold.

"Our results target the immune system as an important carrier of the long-term negative impact of early family conflict," said Sheldon Cohen, a professor of psychology at Carnegie Mellon.

"They also suggest that all divorces are not equal," Cohen said. Continued communication between parents buffers harmful effects of separation on the health path of the children, he added.

The results were published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics explains how to support children of separated/divorced parents.