powered by centersite dot net
Parenting
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Heath Tip: It's Back-to-School TimeHelping Kids Adapt to a New SchoolTake the Back Pain Out of BackpacksHealth Tip: Identify BullyingPaternal Age in the United States Is RisingAmerica's New Dads Are Older Than EverMany Parents Not Happy With Later School Start TimesVaccination 101: Make Sure Kids Are Up to DateParents Worried About Cyberbullies as School Starts UpMajority of U.S. Parents Would Support Teen Switching Gender: SurveyHaving Same-Sex Parents Won't Affect Kids' Gender Identity: StudyBack-to-School Tips … for ParentsCoping Support Assists Parents of Hospitalized ChildrenDate Nights for Overbooked Parents'Super Moms' and 'Super Dads': Work-Home Conflicts Affect Both GendersDespite Warnings, Kids Are Still Dying in Hot CarsIncreased Parental Anxiety With Increased Diabetes RiskHow to Prevent Future Couch PotatoesHealth Tip: Practice Drowning Prevention at HomeDo Older Dads Produce Brainy Boys?Most Mothers Have Been Victims of 'Mommy-Shaming,' Poll FindsTime for Some Summer Sun Safety TipsWhen Parents Focus on Smartphones, Kids' Misbehaving Can RiseCan Sharing Your Bedroom With Baby Come With Risks?Brush Up on Swim Safety for SummerDo Daughters Bring Out a Dad's 'Softer Side'?Are All Those 'Fidget Spinners' Really Helping Kids?1 in 5 U.S. Kids Killed in Crashes Not Restrained ProperlyMany Parents Underestimate Drowning RisksHealth Tip: Be a Safe Driver for Your Kids'Dr. Google' May Undermine Parents' Trust in Their PediatricianAre You Raising an 'Emotional Eater'?Health Tip: Concerned About Your Child's Weight?Could a Clinical Trial Help Your Child?Parents' Pot Use a Tricky Topic When It Comes to Their KidsHealth Tip: Help Your Child with Body Image'Eraser Challenge' Latest Harmful Social Media Trend for KidsSpring-Clean Your Medicine Cabinet to Safeguard Your KidsObese Moms May Fail to Spot Obesity in Their Own KidsAs Pot Legalization Advances, Pediatricians Warn of DangersKids Mean Less Shuteye for Mom, While Dad Slumbers On'Love Hormone' Helps Dads and Babies BondBe Your Child's ValentineHarsh Parenting Can Backfire With Bad Behavior From TeensParents of Kids With Heart Defects Face PTSD Risk: StudyChronic Bullying Can Show Up in Report CardsParents Have Mixed Views on When to Keep Sick Kids Out of SchoolHead for the Hills With Sled Safety in MindKids' Care May Suffer When Parents Clash With Medical StaffHealth Tip: Getting Your Child Vaccinated
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook ReviewsSelf-Help Groups
Related Topics

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Family & Relationship Issues
Internet Addiction and Media Issues
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)
Child Development & Parenting: Middle (8-11)
Child Development Theory: Middle Childhood (8-11)
Child & Adolescent Development: Puberty
Child Development Theory: Adolescence (12-24)
Child Development & Parenting:Adolescence (12-24)

Back-to-School Tips … for Parents

HealthDay News
by -- Randy Dotinga
Updated: Aug 20th 2017

new article illustration

SUNDAY, Aug. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A critical lesson for parents to master as their kids return to school: Cut them some slack.

"The first days and weeks are tough, so it's best for parents to provide as much patience, understanding and support as possible," said Spencer Clark, an assistant professor of education at Kansas State University.

The early days of school will plant roots for the rest of the academic year, Clark and his colleagues said in a university news release.

Here are their tips for getting the school year off to an A-plus start:

  • Offer kids a choice. "Anytime kids have a choice, it's freeing," said Lori Levin, an assistant professor of curriculum and instruction. "Providing choices, such as what to wear and whether to bring a lunch or eat in the school cafeteria, helps students feel a sense of ownership in the process of preparing for school."
  • Make sure they're rested. Kids in full-day kindergarten may be tired and fussy for the first few weeks. Put them to bed 15 minutes earlier each night until they get to the best bedtime, and use blackout shades if needed. Children in elementary school should sleep 10 to 11 hours a day.
  • Bank on breakfast. Prepare a healthy breakfast or provide high-protein granola bars to eat in the morning. "It doesn't have to be elaborate, but they do need to have something in their tummies before they head off to school for hours of learning," Levin said.
  • Focus on connection. "Studies show that the No. 1 thing that helps kids be resilient through middle school is knowing they have one adult in their life, whether it's a parent, teacher, coach or clergy member, who they can rely on," Levin said.
  • Share your own experiences. Talk to your kids about your own experiences in school -- and listen to theirs. "Listening attentively and without judgment is so important," Levin said.
  • Consider your own expectations. "Studies of feedback from high schoolers show they are under tremendous pressure, which they put on themselves and feel from parents to get good grades, be in a sport and get into a great college," Levin said. "Having reasonable expectations is important. So many teens try to do it all and get overwhelmed. Having some down time without technology is really important."

More information

For more about preparing kids for school, viist the U.S.-based National Education Association.