powered by centersite dot net
Child Development & Parenting:Adolescence (12-24)
Resources
Basic Information
Adolescent Parenting IntroductionHealthy Teens: Food, Eating & Nutrition During AdolescenceHealthy Teens: Exercise and SportsHealthy Teens: SleepParenting Teens: Clothing Clashes, Housing Decisions, & Financial ManagementParenting Teens: Skincare, Cosmetics, Tattoos, & Piercings Caring for Teens: Healthcare for Teens and Young AdultsParenting Teens: Discipline, Love, Rules & ExpectationsA Parentís Guide to Protecting Teensí Health and SafetyAdolescent Parenting Summary & ConclusionAdolescent Parenting: References & ResourcesLatest News
Self-Harm Cases Surging Among U.S. GirlsFat Distribution May Influence Bone Strength in AdolescenceTeens' Painkiller Misuse Linked to Dating ViolenceWhat It Takes to Get Teens MovingSport Sampling in Children Tied to More Exercise in AdolescenceIs Too Much Time Online Raising Suicide Risk in Teen Girls?Lunchtime H2O May Be Key to Curbing Kids' ObesityHearing Loss Among U.S. Adolescents Is Not IncreasingPreventive Care for Adolescents Up Since ACA ImplementationAbusing Pot, Booze Lowers Teens' Chances for Success in LifeWith Cigarettes Out of Favor, Many U.S. Teens Also Shun PotA Teen Mom's Stress May Harm Her HeartAlcoholic Parent May Sow Seeds for Teen Dating ViolenceTeen E-Cig Use May Lead to Regular SmokingHockey Study Suggests Injured Kids Sent Back on the Ice Too SoonDecline in U.S. Teen Drug Abuse Means Less Crime, ViolenceAdderall Misuse May Be Hidden Part of Teen Amphetamine AbuseKeeping Your Driving Teen Focused on the RoadHigh-Nicotine E-Cigs May Be Gateway to Smoking for TeensSmartphones, Tablets Sabotaging Teens' SleepState Laws Help Reduce Concussions in Youth SportsSelf-Harm on the Rise Among Teen Girls1 in 5 Young Women Who Tan Indoors Get AddictedWho's Most at Risk of Head Injury in Youth Football?Nearly a Third of College Kids Think ADHD Meds Boost GradesPediatric Physicians Should Revisit Approaches to MarijuanaHoming In on Homework HelpVitamin K-1 Intake Tied to Heart Structure, Function in TeensAnother Downside to College Boozing: Poorer Job ProspectsToo Little of This Vitamin Could Harm Young HeartsHealth Tip: Talking To Your Kids About TattoosOveruse Injuries Don't Impact Young Football Players20 Percent of U.S. Teens May Have Had a ConcussionAAP Offers Guidance for Infectious Disease in SportsGun Violence in Movies a Trigger for Teens?More Teen Dads?Youth Football Ups Odds of Brain Problems in AdulthoodGirl Soccer Players Take More Chances After ConcussionsFocus on Just One Sport Can Mean Stress for GirlsAre Today's Teens Putting the Brakes on Adulthood?AAP Issues Clinical Report on Teen Tattoos, PiercingsEven Teens Can Suffer Organ Damage From High Blood PressureSurgery Can Be Trigger for Teen Opioid AbuseYoung Kids With Cellphones Face a Hidden Risk8 Ways College Women Can Protect Their HealthRegular Weigh-Ins May Help Prevent College Weight GainPoor Health Habits Add Up to Poor Grades for TeensGet Your Kids to Eat Smart at SchoolTeam Sports for Kids: A Winning ComboLater School Bell Could Boost U.S. Economy by $83 Billion Over Decade
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Internet Addiction and Media Issues
Child Development & Parenting: Middle (8-11)
Child Development Theory: Adolescence (12-24)

8 Ways College Women Can Protect Their Health

HealthDay News
by -- Randy Dotinga
Updated: Sep 11th 2017

new article illustration

MONDAY, Sept. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The start of college means it's time for young women to take charge of their health.

Dr. Aparna Sridhar, an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of California, Los Angeles, offers several tips in a university news release.

Know your health status. Talk to your parents and your doctor to make sure you're up-to-date with health screenings, shots and prescriptions. Ask about the status of allergies and other health issues.

Guard against HPV. Sridhar said college students should make sure they have been immunized for human papilloma virus (HPV), a sexually transmitted infection. "It can cause cervical cancer but can be prevented by the HPV vaccination and screening with pap smears," she said.

Know how to get health care on campus. Find out the location of the closest health center that accepts your insurance.

Keep track of menstrual cycles. Being aware of your cycle will allow you to provide specifics to doctors if there's an issue. "When I ask my patients when their last period was, the first thing they do is open their cellphone. Many women are tracking their cycles through apps now," Sridhar said. You might also want to track your mood, cramps and birth control use.

Protect yourself during sex. Consider condom use to guard against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Prevent unplanned pregnancies by using birth control and emergency contraception after unprotected sex.

Don't tolerate sexual abuse or violence. One in four undergraduate women is sexually assaulted on campus. Consult the campus website or your dorm's resident assistant for help reporting an assault.

Follow good hygiene habits. Change sanitary protection as recommended. Use fragrance-free, pH-neutral soap in the vaginal area instead of scented soaps or shampoos. Avoid feminine sprays, douches or powders.

"Vaginal discharge is abnormal if you have itching, redness and pain," Sridhar said. "I recommend patients to see a doctor if they have discharge that is greenish-yellow, foamy or a bad smell."

Beware of urinary tract infections. "Drink plenty of water to flush out your system and talk to your doctor if you have pain and frequent urination with burning," Sridhar said. "If neglected, these can lead to kidney infections." Always urinate after having sex.

More information

For more about women's health, visit womenshealth.gov.